Ad

Breaking News

5 things to know when visiting Dubai during the holy month

5 things to know when visiting Dubai during the holy month play 5 things to know when visiting Dubai during the holy month
(Kamran Jebreili/AP)

Ramadan is the best month to visit Dubai to get a great feel of Islamic traditions.

The holy month of Ramadan is a month of fasting for Muslims worldwide, however, there are various things to consider when visiting Dubai this time of the year.
17. Dubai, United Arab Emirates play 17. Dubai, United Arab Emirates
(Shutterstock/Dmitry Birin)

An understanding of the rules and local culture can ensure you remain respectful and avoid getting jail.

1. Ban on eating

Eating, drinking, smoking and chewing gum in public are prohibited and can be punishable of up to a month in jail or a fine of up to Dhs 2,000 (USD$545) according to Article 313 of the UAE Penal Code. This applies to everyone, irrespective of faith.
In fact, many restaurants are closed until sunset. However, several places are allowed to continue serving food during the day to non-fasters. These restaurants will have dark sheets covering their windows and will only permit dining inside.
Dubai has also recently relaxed its rules regarding the sale of alcohol during Ramadan.

2. Loud music is prohibited

Tourists have to be sensitive and respectful. Refrain from playing loud music. Whether in your car or strolling through malls, music is prohibited.

3. Dress conservatively

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman speaks with Emirati Vice President, Prime Minister, and ruler of Dubai Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum on the sidelines of an Arab League summit on April 16, 2018 play Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman speaks with Emirati Vice President, Prime Minister, and ruler of Dubai Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum on the sidelines of an Arab League summit on April 16, 2018
(Saudi Royal Palace/AFP/File)

While Dubai is very lenient, it would be preferable to refrain from wearing revealing, tight and short clothes to prevent offending locals. Generally covering yourself from your shoulders to your knees is advised for both men and women.
Public displays of affection are already considered disrespectful in Dubai, especially between unmarried couples.

4. Haq Al Laila

Haq Al Laila is a very unique Ramadan tradition. It involves children walking around their neighbourhoods collecting sweets and nuts from their community. As with iftar, local families often invite non-local children to join in.

5. Working hours are shorter

Working and school days are shorter. According to UAE labour law, normal working hours are reduced by two hours during Ramadan, making the average working day around six hours long. While this does not specify only Muslim fasting employees, the Employment Law of Dubai International Financial Centre specifically refers to Muslims, stating that they don’t have to work longer than six hours.